The Art Institutes
Information

Request Brochure

MENU

Request Brochure

News & Community

Our students are engaged in the communities in which they live and attend school. They volunteer their artistic and culinary talents to organizations large and small to help make their corner of the world a better place.

Filter Results By

The Art Institute of New York City Takes Fashion from Classroom to Runway at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week The Art Institute of New York City Takes Fashion from Classroom to Runway at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week

[LOS ANGELES, CA September 4, 2012] – The International Culinary Schools at The Art Institutes, North America's largest system of culinary programs offered at more than 40 Art Institutes schools, announces the launch of The Art Institutes (Ai) Food Truck Tour. The tour is inspired by Food Network’s The Great Food Truck Race, bringing cooking competitions to communities in Inland Empire, Los Angeles, Orange County and San Diego.

Culinary Arts students to battle it out with Food Truck favorites in four cities

The Art Institutes (Ai) Food Truck Tour coincides with the third season of Food Network’s hit reality competition series The Great Food Truck Race, which can be seen on Sunday nights at 9:00 p.m. through the September 30 finale. Culinary Arts students from The International Culinary Schools at The Art Institutes will be asked to battle local food truck favorites. The trucks will each be challenged to create a dish that includes the same ingredients. Celebrity chefs plus contestants from previous seasons of The Great Food Truck Race, The Lime Truck and Sky’s Gourmet Tacos, will be on-site to judge the matchups.

The tour will provide guests and aspiring student chefs with the ability to watch the competitions live, taste diverse cuisine from participating local food trucks and to take photos on-site with local celebrity chefs. A portion of each participating truck’s sales will benefit the local Art Institutes’ culinary scholarships.

“The food truck phenomenon is certainly a culinary industry trend we want to expose our students to as another way to pursue a fulfilling career in the industry,” said Chef Michael Nenes, assistant vice president of Culinary Arts for The International Culinary Schools at The Art Institutes. “This tour will allow our students to put their skills to work beyond the classroom and showcase their knowledge of world cuisines in a once unconventional environment of a food truck, all while having fun with the local community.”

The tour will also showcase talented graduates from The International Culinary Schools at The Art Institutes who have garnered national recognition including Jesse Brockman, a 2009 alumnus of The Art Institute of California – Orange County with an Associate of Science degree in Culinary Arts, who was a member of The Great Food Truck Race winning team last year with The Lime Truck.

The Art Institutes (Ai) Food Truck Tour – Event Information
The community is invited to enjoy The Art Institutes (Ai) Food Truck Tour experience at several venues. The truck will make an additional community appearance on the Huntington Beach Pier on September 15 and the cooking battles will be held at Art Institutes’ campuses at the following locations at no cost to attend:

Cooking Battle - September 5, 2012
4:00 – 8:00 p.m.
The Art Institute of California - Inland Empire, a campus of Argosy University
674 East Brier Drive
San Bernardino, CA 92408

Cooking Battle - September 8, 2012
1:00 – 5:00 p.m.
The Art Institute of California - Los Angeles, a campus of Argosy University
2900 31st Street
Santa Monica, CA 90405

Cooking Battle - September 13, 2012
4:00 – 8:00 p.m.
The Art Institute of California - Orange County, a campus of Argosy University
3601 W. Sunflower Avenue
Santa Ana, CA 92704

Cooking Battle - September 22, 2012
1:00 – 5:00 p.m.
The Art Institute of California - San Diego, a campus of Argosy University
7650 Mission Valley Road
San Diego, CA 92108

Follow the tour on Facebook at facebook.com/artinstitutes and Twitter at #AiFoodTruck.

About The Art Institutes
The Art Institutes (www.artinstitutes.edu) is a system of more than 50 schools located throughout North America. The Art Institutes schools provide an important source for design, media arts, fashion and culinary arts professionals. Several institutions included in The Art Institutes system are campuses of South University or Argosy University. OH Registration # 04-01-1698B; AC0165, AC0080; Licensed by the Florida Commission for Independent Education, License No. 1287, 3427, 3110, 2581. See aiprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

About The Great Food Truck Race
Food Network's The Great Food Truck Race returns for a third season this summer, with host Tyler Florence presiding over the cross-country culinary road trip with a brand-new twist: no longer a competition between current food truck operators as in prior seasons, this high-stakes battle is between eight teams who desperately want to be in the food truck business - they have a dream, a concept and insane culinary skills. Each three-person team is provided a vehicle for the race, but only the grand prize winner gets to keep their food truck and a $50,000 cash prize to start their dream business. From mobile mini-pies and authentic Aussie grub to specialty waffles, each team's inspired cuisine and road strategy is put to the test in city-specific challenges that begin at a Long Beach, Calif. lighthouse and continue through the finale at the West Quoddy Lighthouse in Maine, the easternmost point of the United States. For even more Food Trucks, viewers can visit www.foodnetwork.com/foodtrucks all season long for exclusive behind-the-scenes photos, video recaps and weekly blog posts. Fans of The Great Food Truck Race can also check out their favorite food trucks from previous seasons with the newly launched Food Network On the Road app for iPhone® and iPad® available for free download on iTunes. Food Network's On the Road will provide fans with a curated selection from Food Network chefs, and from hot spots seen on hit shows like Diners Drive-Ins and Dives and Best Thing I Ever Ate. For more information about Food Network On the Road, visit http://www.foodnetwork.com/ontheroad.

Read more...
The Art Institutes Partners with Military Families United (MFU) to Provide Scholarships to Spouses of Armed Forces Members The Art Institutes Partners with Military Families United (MFU) to Provide Scholarships to Spouses of Armed Forces Members

[Washington D.C., August 27, 2012] – The Art Institutes and Military Families United (MFU), a national coalition of Gold Star and Blue Star families, veterans and patriotic Americans announce four winners each of a $25,000 tuition scholarship to attend an Art Institutes school. The scholarship recipients are:

  • Briana Pierson, Oceanside, California-The Art Institute of Pittsburgh – Online Division
  • Maria Clarissa Peters, La Mesa, California-The Art Institute of California, San Diego, a campus of Argosy University
  • Michelle O’Brien, Colorado Springs, Colorado-The Art Institute of Colorado
  • Michele Durante, Modesto, California-The Art Institute of California, San Francisco, a campus of Argosy University

The Art Institutes system of schools and MFU partnered to create the scholarship program to provide educational support to spouses of Armed Forces members, including Active Duty, Active National Guard and Reserve, and spouses of those killed in the line of duty post 9/11.

“We appreciate the service these men and women make to our country and we are pleased to be able to provide support for an education that will help them get started on the path to a creative career,” said John Mazzoni, President of The Art Institutes. “As spouses of members of the military, they are helping to create a brighter tomorrow for us. At The Art Institutes, we want to help them in their pursuit of an education that can help to launch the next phase of their careers.”

“We are excited about this new opportunity because The Art Institutes system of schools is a leader in delivering online and on ground educational opportunities to students and they believe, as we do, that providing high quality educational opportunities to members of our Armed Forces and their families ensures a better future for our country,” said Robert Jackson, Executive Director of Military Families United.

The Art Institutes is proud to provide educational opportunities to our nation’s veterans and their families and, like MFU, share a deep gratitude to the men and women who keep America safe. The Art Institutes is uniquely suited to serve our nation’s military, offering a broad array of educational programs that provide active duty service members, reservists, veterans, military spouses and families the quality, flexibility, and convenience they seek both on campus and online.

To learn more about The Art Institutes schools visit www.artinstitutes.edu.

For more information on the scholarship program, please visit http://militaryspouses.artinstitutes.edu.

The Art Institutes ( www.artinstitutes.edu ) is a system of more than 50 schools located throughout North America. The Art Institutes schools provide an important source for design, media arts, fashion and culinary arts professionals. Several institutions included in The Art Institutes system are campuses of South University or Argosy University. OH Registration # 04-01-1698B; AC0165, AC0080; Licensed by the Florida Commission for Independent Education, License No. 1287, 3427, 3110, 2581. Since The Art Institutes is comprised of several institutions, see aiprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

Military Families United (MFU) ( www.militaryfamiliesunited.org ) is a not-for-profit organization whose mission is to “Honor the Fallen, Support Those Who Fight, and Serve Their Families.” The organization is a national coalition of Gold Star and Blue Star families, veterans and others who share a deep appreciation for our men and women in uniform. Founded in 2005, MFU provides programs that offer families direct support.

Read more...
Rethinking Small Office Design: Creating a More Collaborative and Imaginative Workplace Rethinking Small Office Design: Creating a More Collaborative and Imaginative Workplace

In the age of wireless communication, telecommuting and global travel, a professional’s “office” has become more of a virtual world located anywhere from a hip coffee shop to a busy airport. This makes creating one’s stationary office as a place that is fun, stimulating and imaginative even more important.

Certified Interior Designer and Interior Design Faculty at The Art Institute of California – Sacramento, Sara Seward, highlights ways to accomplish a more collaborative environment that is replacing the look and bulk of the cubicle and provides a modern, architectural feeling.

For example, she recommends that offices feature more casual areas to gather for a quick meeting, juice bars to host social events, or lounging areas to relax. Also, keeping the design simple and using lighter, modern finishes can increase the feeling of open space.

Amy J. Aswell, who holds a Master’s in Interior Architecture and is also an instructor of interior design at The Art Institute of California – Sacramento, agrees, adding that if people are expected to work in small cubicles, “provide them with a ‘break away’ space that gives them an alternative area to work or hold impromptu meetings.”

Aswell notices a trend toward residential living room layouts for these break away areas, as well more home-like amenities being added such as lounge furniture.

For employees who want to dress up their office or cubicle, Academic Director of Interior Design at The Art Institute of California – Silicon Valley, Sandra Slade, has the following tips:

  • Hang one focal piece of artwork and add sculptural interest on a credenza or side table but avoid very strong or controversial subjects in your art
  • Family pictures are nice, but don't overdue it and limit yourself to a few
  • Adding a nice live plant or small tree offers a nice feng shui touch
  • Maintain professionalism in your color scheme by adding an accent wall of medium color paint or surround yourself with a soft neutral

When it comes to shared work spaces for independent consultants or small business owners, Slade acknowledges a freedom from corporate office décor guidelines but advises not to “go overboard” on personal expression.

“You will still want to appear professional,” she says, “and that can be accomplished by avoiding lots of distracting ‘toys’ on the desk and keeping the space orderly.

“Since your office may also be your conference space, allow for a comfortable upholstered guest office chair. You might also want to add a small side table with a sculptural piece for sophistication,” suggests Slade.

Seward concludes that the need for a typical office has been replaced with flexible environments that maximize the use of square footage along with what makes the staff comfortable. “No matter the space, it’s about allowing employees to work in whatever manner they need to stay productive.”

To learn more about an Art Institutes school, visit www.artinstitutes.edu.

The Art Institutes (www.artinstitutes.edu) is a system of more than 45 education institutions located throughout North America. The Art Institutes system is America's Leader in Creative Education providing an important source for design, media arts, fashion and culinary arts professionals. Several institutions included in The Art Institutes system are campuses of South University.

See aiprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

Read more...
Greening Up Your Kitchen Greening Up Your Kitchen

The mantra of the green earth movement – reduce, reuse, recycle – can easily be adapted in your kitchen. No need to redo your entire kitchen with bamboo floors, the newest energy efficient appliances, counters made of recycled paper and yogurt containers, and locally made antique cabinetry. In fact, the greenest option is to keep the kitchen you already have and adopt some new practices.

Stocking Your Kitchen
“The most important starting point is to stock your kitchen with simple basic foods so you can cook at home as when possible,” says Chef Anthony Mandriota of The Art Institute of Tennessee – Nashville, a branch of The Art Institute of Atlanta. “And try to incorporate locally produced, unrefined, and organic foods into the pantry whenever possible.” You’ll need olive or canola oil, different vinegars, salt, pepper, dried herbs and spices, rice, pasta, beans (preferably dried), and if you intend to do some baking – flours, sugar or other natural sweeteners, baking powder and baking soda (also useful for cleaning). Perishable items include basic vegetables like onions, garlic, carrots and celery, seasonal vegetables (including salad greens) and fruits, milk, eggs, butter or natural margarine, cheese, nuts, bread and meat, poultry and fish. Take reusable bags with you and purchase in small amounts so that you’ll be sure to use your stores before they spoil, and fresh so that you reduce the amount of packaging.

For locally sourced produce, consider joining a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture), which is a group of people who support a farming operation in order to receive fresh fruits and vegetables each week as they are produced. There are many different models; research what’s available in your area with an internet search on CSA. Or ask at your local organic food market. Says Chef Noel Ridsdale of The Art Institute of Jacksonville, a branch of Miami International University of Art & Design, “Locally sourced ingredients, whether from a farmer’s market, CSA, or your local food store, offer great taste and freshness as well as a lower carbon footprint than food that’s been flown across the country or from the other side of the world.”

Cooking at Home
Cooking at home doesn’t need to be overly complex or time consuming. Chef Eric Watson of The Art Institute of Charleston, a branch of The Art Institute of Atlanta, advises, “Most cooking is based on a few foundation techniques. You may wish to take a class or two at a local cooking school or ask a family member or friend to teach you. Even videos or cooking shows on TV can provide you with the fundamentals.” Start with basic knife skills – peeling and cutting up vegetables and fruits, and chopping herbs. From there, basic techniques include mixing, roasting or baking, sautéing, grilling, simmering and steaming. Learn these simple techniques by heart and you’ll be able to prepare a roast chicken with vegetables and salad for dinner in an hour, without a recipe.

A couple of hours spent organizing, planning and doing advance preparation in your kitchen each week can really pay off in making those home-cooked dinners a breeze.

And remember to reuse your vegetable scraps. “Do what chefs do,” says Chef Watson. “Save your vegetable scraps to make stock. You can freeze these until you have time to put them on to simmer for a few hours. Strain and then freeze until you need it.”

Kitchen Clean Up
You don’t need to sacrifice sanitation and food safety to make your kitchen green. “Make sure you avoid cross contamination, “ warns Chef Jim Gallivan of The Art Institute of Atlanta. “Use warm soapy water to wash knives, utensils and cutting boards between preparing poultry, meat or fish and vegetables or fruit.” Cut down on waste by using dishtowels instead of paper products as much as possible, and by recycling what you can’t reuse. Save water by running water only when absolutely necessary. Save energy by letting the dishes in the dishwasher air dry with the door open. And use environmentally-friendly cleaning solutions – they are almost always less toxic to your family and pets, too. Antibacterial soaps are not usually necessary. And did you know that baking soda can scrub pots and pans without scratching?

If you have even a small yard, you can compost vegetable and fruit scraps, egg shells and leftover grains. (Don’t include any meat or fish products to avoid attracting pests.) See your local garden center or visit your state extension service’s website for information. Compost is great for shrubs, flowers, and vegetables.

Enjoy!
Putting delicious food on the table to enjoy with the people you love – or even just for yourself – is one of the best feelings in the world. “People who love to cook – whether they are chefs or home cooks – love every part of the process. Planning meals, searching out ingredients, preparing the food, the smell of different foodstuffs cooking – all can be immensely satisfying and enjoyable,” says Chef Mandriota. “Cooking is a great antidote to the stress of modern life. And eating seasonally reminds us of the rhythms of nature and of life itself.”

Read more...
Top Trends in Bridal Wear Top Trends in Bridal Wear

Although the latest Brides American Wedding Study shows the average cost of a wedding in 2010 was $26,501, a decrease of 5 percent from 2009, weddings continue to be big business. But many couples are opting to cut the guest list instead of big ticket items like wedding gowns.

In fact, according to the study, the average wedding gown cost $1,289 in 2010, a 20 percent increase over 2009. This is no surprise to the millions who were glued to their television sets this past April during the most talked about wedding since the 1981 royal wedding of Lady Diana to Prince Charles. Many brides are now emulating the elegant lace gown worn by Catherine Middleton, now the Duchess of Cambridge.

In addition to beautiful lace, the newest trends in wedding gowns include color, soft sleeves, short hemlines and eco-friendly materials.

Whether it is Chantilly, Alençon, Duchesse, Guipure, or ribbon, lace has become one of the hottest trends this year. “Designers at all price points have debuted collections featuring full frothy skirts, wildflowers, and lace used in both traditional and modern ways,” says Kate Campbell, department chair of Fashion & Retail Management at The Art Institute of Tampa, a branch of Miami International University of Art & Design. “This particular trend parallels the more feminine, elegant trends we see in fashion everywhere – including more fitted and ladylike styles reminiscent of Grace Kelly and Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy.”

While not for everyone, the use of color in wedding gowns has been growing in popularity. Rich and vibrant or more subdued, color in bridal wear is everywhere. Some brides choose soft pastel colors, such as blush, rose or skin-tone. Others opt to wear vibrant hues of lavender, green and deep pink. Less bold brides are more likely to use hints of accent color on sashes, bows, embroidery, hems, necklines or beading. “The bride who chooses to add color to her dress is fashion forward and confident – it’s not for the faint of heart,” says Amber Chatelain, lead faculty for the Fashion & Retail Management program at The Art Institute of Nashville — Tennessee, a branch of The Art Institute of Atlanta.

Another interesting new trend in bridal wear is short gowns, especially for brides choosing destination and beach weddings. While they may be short in length, these dresses are not short on style. Some offer sophisticated laces, chic feathers or multilayered organza mini-skirts.

Soft sleeves are enjoying a comeback. Designers have debuted soft, romantic sleeves, including traditional cap sleeves in florals and tulle, modern silhouettes using vintage elements, sequin fringe and flutter sleeves, and romantic off-the-shoulder versions. “The softness and elegance of the sleeves in bridal wear mirrors today’s general fashion trends, where designers are highlighting the elegance and beauty of the female form in very soft ways,” says Charlene Parsons, who heads the fashion programs at Miami International University of Art & Design.

Eco-friendly options have also increased in popularity. “There are now numerous eco-friendly designers whose sole business is to create wedding dresses made with earth-friendly fabrics and materials, using techniques that are in harmony with the earth,” says Crystal Shamblee, department chair of Fashion Design for The Art Institute of Philadelphia. Second-hand and vintage wedding dresses are another eco-friendly choice.

Whatever fashion trends a bride chooses, one that will never go out of style is a gown that fits well, is figure flattering and makes the bride feel she’s the most beautiful woman in the world on her big day.

Read more...
Career Change – Passion You Have to Pursue Career Change – Passion You Have to Pursue

Whether you are pursuing a life-long passion or looking to reinvent yourself, it is never too late to pursue a new career. Aimee Flynn, Career Services Director at The Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham, offers tips on changing careers and making the most of this transitional period.

Hunt & Gather: It's important to start with a thorough investigation into your new industry. "You are looking for general parallels between who you are and who you want to be, where you've been and where you are going," said Flynn.

Pasha Lemnah, a photography student at The Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham, found this parallel between the past and the future. After 20 years in the nursing field, she reevaluated her life and what she wanted from her career. This investigation led her to pursue her childhood passion of photography.

Seasoned Pro or Newbie? According to Flynn, dumping the ego is crucial. "Be open to starting fresh, and embrace a sense of equal status with everyone in the classroom," she said. "Surrender to the fact that you can learn as much from a first year student as they can from you."

Lemnah embraces this equal status, finding support through her fellow students who refer to her as "Mama Pasha."

Network. Network. Network. While this is a common tip, be smart about how and with whom you network. Try to network with people already employed in your field of interest. Surround yourself with people who are supportive and can help you acquire new contacts.

Now that you're back in the classroom, go beyond it: Attend local "Lunch and Learns", workshops and industry-related events.

Be willing to change: "Every industry has its own tenors; its own language. Adopt them," said Flynn. Evaluate your Facebook, Twitter and social networking pages to reflect who you want to be.

A willingness to change is a key factor in successfully reinventing yourself through your career. A great example is Denise Hartz, an interior design student at The Art Institute of Michigan. Hartz, who is retiring from her current career in two years, said "I want to be a successful older person. I don't want to retire to retire." Instead, she's taking steps to turn a passion she's had for years into a new career in interior design.

Revisit your resume: "Develop a new resume as a platform to highlight your critical and analytical thinking skills, your leadership abilities and willingness to collaborate, your planning and management skills, and your ability to facilitate creative thinking when faced with a problem to solve," recommends Flynn.

Build your team: Find a dedicated Career Services advisor. Flynn said, "make an appointment, show up prepared, and be humble and open to an entry level experience"

"I just think it's never too late in life to do what you want to do…pursue a dream," said Hartz. Lemnah echoes this statement, calling herself a "walking, living, breathing dream catcher."

Read more...
Comfort Foods + Good Health? Yes! Comfort Foods + Good Health? Yes!

Comfort foods remind us of home, warmth and family; they are often simple, everyday foods we had as children. Eric Watson, dean of academic affairs at The Art Institute of Charleston, a branch of The Art Institute of Atlanta, and a professional chef, says, "When people are looking for comfort foods, it is not just about the food, but about how they feel and the general need to be comfortable and relaxed."

Comfort foods tend to be hearty, cold-weather dishes based on meats, cheeses and carbohydrates – all of which can pack on the pounds. But even if you’re trying to reduce that holiday bulge, you can still enjoy your favorite comfort foods. Just make them healthier!

Chef Jim Gallivan, department chair of Culinary Arts at The International Culinary School at The Art Institute of Atlanta, offers these ten tips.

  • Choose whole grains over refined: brown rice, whole grain bread, whole grain pasta instead of white rice, white bread or standard pasta. Whole grains digest more slowly, providing longer-lasting energy.
  • Use small amounts of olive oil instead of butter on grains or vegetables, and to sauté. A non-aerosol spray bottle can help use oil sparingly.
  • Choose low-fat or fat-free dairy products: skim or one-percent milk, low-fat or fat-free yogurts, sour cream and cheeses – and reduce the amount.
  • Choose Canadian bacon or lean ham over bacon, wild-caught, fresh or water-packed tuna or salmon over oil-packed tuna or salmon, chicken and turkey sausage over pork sausage and lean ground turkey and beef over high-fat options.
  • Use herbs, flavored powders (like garlic powder), citrus (like lemon juice) and heat (like red pepper or hot sauces) over extra salt.
  • Instead of frying, bake, roast or grill using a rub or marinade.
  • Use fresh or frozen vegetables over canned. Remember that frozen vegetables are harvested at peak season and usually flash-frozen, making them superior in flavor and nutrients to off-season fresh ones.
  • Use vegetables and legumes, like chick peas or black beans, to make a dish more hearty. When making a legume soup, puree some for thickness and body, and leave some whole for texture and interest.
  • Feature fresh, seasonal fruits and berries in desserts. The natural sweetness means you can reduce added sweetening.
  • Remember – using low-fat or fat-free dairy products, olive oil, whole grains or lean meats doesn’t mean unlimited portions!

"Dishes like lasagna, chili, macaroni 'n' cheese and apple pie have the power to comfort us," says Chef John Maxwell, academic director of Culinary Arts at The Art Institute of Jacksonville, a branch of Miami International University of Art & Design. "But with some adjustments, these foods can also sustain good health."


Read more...
Just the Right Size: How to Shop Online Just the Right Size: How to Shop Online

Shopping online for clothes has many benefits. There is the convenience of shopping from the comfort of your home when you don’t have time to drive to a store and browse the racks. It is also great for researching the best price for an item you already know you want, especially for wardrobe staples like a white button-down blouse or a pair of skinny jeans. There is also the thrill of finding a package with your name on it waiting at your doorstep. Still, the concern that stops many people from pushing their virtual shopping basket to check out is sizing. To learn how to order just the right size when shopping online for clothes, follow this advice from fashion school pros in Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Measure Yourself

“It may seem simple, but invest in a measuring tape,” says Claude Brown, academic director of the Fashion Design and the Fashion Marketing & Management programs at The Art Institute of California— Los Angeles. “It costs less than five bucks, and will make all the difference when finding your right size online.”

Sizing can vary widely from brand to brand noted Brown, who also designs his own collection of dresses and sportswear. So if you are trying a new and unfamiliar brand, a key first step is to measure your waist, hips, bust and inseam.

Retailer sites will often have measuring guides that describe where and how to measure. Two measuring tips from Geetika Gupta, a full-time instructor at The Art Institute of California— San Francisco who teaches courses in both fashion design and fashion marketing, is to always measure over undergarments and allow the tape to roughly skim the body, not sag or cut in.

Read Charts and Descriptions

Gupta also advises to take a close look at the size charts of the brand you are browsing. “With your measurements in hand you can figure out where you generally fit into a brand’s size ranges.”

“Then what you want to do is read the garment description and look for key words based on fit,” adds Gupta who also runs her own fashion design and wholesaling business. Indicator words such as “high-waisted” or “boy fit” can help you decide if an item might be the right shape or style for your body, and better align with your fit preferences, which are very personal Gupta notes.

Brown also cautions that you can’t just rely on photos either. One of the reasons clothes can look perfect on the models is because sometimes a garment is clipped, pinned, and taped to the body to look just so.

Look for Low Cost Shipping

Online shopping features like a live chat, virtual shopping assistants and runway videos are occasionally available but, with your measurements and new found product knowledge, can be less applicable. Some retailer websites offer to adjust the inseam before they ship your order, which can be worthwhile informs Gupta. “However beware the quality from mass customization websites where you enter your measurements to receive customized pieces of clothing,” Gupta warns.

“In general dresses, skirts and blouses can be easier to assess size and fit,” she recommends. “I also look for sites with free or low-cost return shipping and like to order two sizes of the same item so I can try both on,” at least until she is familiar with a brand and how it fits her, she concludes.


The Art Institutes (www.artinstitutes.edu) is a system of more than 45 educational institutions located throughout North America. The Art Institutes schools provide an important source for design, media arts, fashion and culinary arts professionals. Several institutions included in The Art Institutes system are campuses of South University. See aiprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees, and other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other important info.

Read more...